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National Parks and Recreation Month: Home

 

July is National Parks and Recreation Month. 

The month is a time to celebrate the rich and diverse environment we live in. This month is also an opportune time to educate the general public about national parks, to raise general awareness about why they are important.

Books Available at the Library

Badlands National Park

The South Dakota Badlands seldom fails to stir a sense of wonder to those who encounter its surreal landscape for the first time. From a distance, the eroded formations look like the ruins of an alabaster city, but upon closer inspection, the sculptured terrain appears rough and rugged. Within these pages of historic photographs, the remarkable story of the Badlands unfolds. After the process of geological changes, Indians came to the Badlands on seasonal hunting trips. In the mid 1800s, fur traders, fossil hunters, and freight haulers passed through to places more hospitable. Cattlemen and homesteaders arrived in the 1890s, intent on staying, but most gave up and left. To preserve its grandeur, Congressman Peter Norbeck and his associate Ben Millard worked for many years to set aside thousands of acres of the unyielding land for a national monument in 1939. The Badlands became a national park in 1978.

The Badlands

The South Dakota Badlands seldom fails to stir a sense of wonder to those who encounter its surreal landscape for the first time. From a distance, the eroded formations look like the ruins of an alabaster city, but upon closer inspection, the sculptured terrain appears rough and rugged. Within these pages of historic photographs, the remarkable story of the Badlands unfolds. After the process of geological changes, Indians came to the Badlands on seasonal hunting trips. In the mid 1800s, fur traders, fossil hunters, and freight haulers passed through to places more hospitable. Cattlemen and homesteaders arrived in the 1890s, intent on staying, but most gave up and left. To preserve its grandeur, Congressman Peter Norbeck and his associate Ben Millard worked for many years to set aside thousands of acres of the unyielding land for a national monument in 1939. The Badlands became a national park in 1978.

Exploring Careers in the National Parks

The South Dakota Badlands seldom fails to stir a sense of wonder to those who encounter its surreal landscape for the first time. From a distance, the eroded formations look like the ruins of an alabaster city, but upon closer inspection, the sculptured terrain appears rough and rugged. Within these pages of historic photographs, the remarkable story of the Badlands unfolds. After the process of geological changes, Indians came to the Badlands on seasonal hunting trips. In the mid 1800s, fur traders, fossil hunters, and freight haulers passed through to places more hospitable. Cattlemen and homesteaders arrived in the 1890s, intent on staying, but most gave up and left. To preserve its grandeur, Congressman Peter Norbeck and his associate Ben Millard worked for many years to set aside thousands of acres of the unyielding land for a national monument in 1939. The Badlands became a national park in 1978.

Indian Country, God's Country

Historian Philip Burnham traces the complex and still changing relationship between Native Americans and the national parks from the earliest years of the National Park Service to the latest Congressional initiatives. He recounts how Indians were first removed from their traditional lands (which sub

Dispossessing the Wilderness

National parks like Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Glacier preserve some of this country's most cherished wilderness landscapes. While visions of pristine, uninhabited nature led to the creation of these parks, they also inspired policies of Indian removal. By contrasting the native histories of these places with the links between Indian policy developments and preservationist efforts, this work examines the complex origins of the national parks and the troublingconsequences of the American wilderness ideal. The first study to place national park history within the context of the early reservation era, it details the ways that national parks developed into one ofthe most important arenas of contention between native peoples and non-Indians in the twentieth century.

Children's Books at the Library

Thunder on the Plains

It's been two years and middle-school student Danny Wind is still not over his father's death. When his mom marries a white man and they move to a new "white bread" neighborhood, Danny's life changes. The school principal considers him a troublemaker, and he has to avoid Willy, the school bully, who calls him "redskin" and "Tonto." After Danny acts out and gets suspended from school, his mom decides to send him to a summer survival camp for Native American teens. Danny is sure he is in for a boring summer on the reservation, without Internet access even. Instead, he meets other Native kids, learns to ride and care for horses, and develops a relationship with his grandfather, who teaches him the ways of their tribe. And even though life on the reservation is pretty cool, never in his craziest dreams did Danny expect to become involved in rescuing bison in Yellowstone National Park!

Yellowstone

Yellowstone is a steaming wonderland of hot springs, bubbling mudpots, and spouting geysers.

Our National Parks

Three parks in each of 4 areas of the country are introduced with material on their histories and attractions.

Who Pooped in the Park?

Watch where you step! Sometimes the animals in Yellowstone National Park are hard to find'but you can almost always find their poop! Come along with Michael, Emily, and their family as they find poop (scat) and footprints (tracks) and discover which animal made them! Who Pooped in the Park? Yellowstone National Park is an ideal tool for teaching young children about animal behavior, diet, and scats and tracks identification'it's the perfect companion for in the car or in the field on your next trip to Yellowstone. Fun illustrations of the animals and their scat and tracks supplement the charming story, and a quick-reference chart at the back will make field identification a breeze.

M Is for Majestic

Mighty mountains, wild rivers, fiery volcanoes, huge glaciers, vast forests, tropical islands -- all part of our National Parks, belonging to you and me. This magnificent ABC book showcases each of America's National Parks from Acadia and American Samoa to Yosemite and Zion. California travel writer David Domeniconi masterfully includes each of the more than 50 National Parks in this A-Z pictorial. Illustrator Pam Carroll's keen attention to detail makes this title one for everyone across the land to read and enjoy. David Domeniconi grew up in San Francisco and graduated from San Francisco State College. He is a writer and illustrator whose work has appeared in several West Coast publications. His illustrated travel column, "Travelog" is a regular feature in the Santa Barbara Press. He lives in Carmel-by-the-Sea with his wife, Janet.Pamela Carroll embraces the traditional focus of realism and pictorial illusionism. Her style of painting has been greatly influenced by the early Dutch Masters and the American Realists from the Second School of Philadelphia. She lives with her husband in Carmel, California, where she paints daily, and is an active member of the Carmel Art Association.

Photo from Flickr: Raymond Bucko

Oglala Lakota College Woksape Tipi Library Physical Address: 3 Mile Creek Rd Kyle, SD 57752 Mailing Address: PO Box 310 Kyle, SD 57752 Phone: 1-(605)-455-6069