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Woksape Tipi - Academic/Public Library and Archives: AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE

2018 SPRING OUTREACH

LISTS, REVIEWS, BLOGS

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE RESOURCES

American Indians in Children's Literature Excellent resource for critical reviews of children's literature and related news by Debbie Reese

American Indian Library Association's Youth Literature Award

Children's and YA titles  Native authors and illustrators highlighted in Cynthia Leitich Smith's blog

Don Montileaux Oglala artist and author

oyate recommended for reviews of and ordering recommended American Indian children's titles

S. D. Nelson Hunkpapa artist and author 

COLLEGE AND BEYOND

Amherst College Library Digital Collections: Early Native American Literature Extensive digitized collection of early American Indian authors (1772-1923) 

Early Native American Literature Overview of notable indigenous authors

Tribal Writers Digital Library Works of Native poets and writers of fiction featuring out of print literary efforts of Native people

 

LOCAL REVIEWS

 

One of the things we look for when reading a traditional story rooted in a Native Nation is an attribution of where the story was heard, and from whom; in Tasunka: A Lakota Horse Legend, Don Montileaux gives us that information right away in a two-page introduction. Montileaux heard this story from Alex White Plume, a Lakota elder and storyteller. In a radio interview, Montileaux says more about the story, assuring readers that he is retelling the story as it is told. Initially, White Plume was reluctant to have a traditional story put into print. When he saw what Montileaux had done, he gave him his blessing. In the radio interview, Montileaux also says that Agnes Gay, the woman who did the Lakota translation, works in the archives at Oglala Lakota College. She, too, verified the integrity of Montileaux's telling of that story.